Securitizing Migration: Aspects and Critiques

Securitizing Migration: Aspects and Critiques

by Andreas Themistocleous

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Introduction

Migration has been discussed extensively in recent years. A significant number of studies, from different ideological and political origins, have dealt with the nature, causes and consequences, but also the different types of migration. Among others, migration is considered as a contemporary security threat with serious implications for the socio-political and socioeconomic stability both domestically and regionally[1]. According to official statistics of the International Organization for Migration[2]  the number of migration flows per year, is increasing steadily. The main drift of these flows is from developing and the so called “third world” countries to the developed world.

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Book Review: “Failed States, the Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy”, by Noam Chomsky

Book Review: “Failed States, the Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy”, by Noam Chomsky

Noam Chomsky, Failed States, the Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy (Penguin Books)  320pp., 2007, $5.95

By Andreas Themistocleous

The term failed states has been used by social and political scientists, in order to identify countries that present serious and lasting malfunctions[1]. Failed states are usually characterized by internal instability, major social contradictions, and ethnic and/or religious conflicts; while the most common example of a failed state is Somalia[2]. However, Chomsky’s book Failed States, the Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy offers a different approach to the issue through redefining the content of the terminological basis. This new conceptual framework introduces a set of factors determining the US as the greatest failed state. In this light, Chomsky develops a multidimensional analysis in order to examine various aspects that compose the USA’s identity as a “failed state” in both its domestic and foreign policy.

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The Austerity Measures in Greece and the Economic Crisis

The Austerity Measures in Greece and the Economic Crisis

by Andreas Themistocleous

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Introduction

A great deal of ink has been used in the last four years to consider, analyse or simply to describe the current global economic crisis. The simplest and most understandable statement, derived from the beginning of the last century, which could describe eloquently and concisely the global economic crisis comes from Keynes: “If you owe your bank a hundred pounds, you have a problem. But if you owe a million, it has”.[1]

The global economic crisis could be characterised as a momentous event, which has influenced the economic, social, and broader political realities to a large extent worldwide. In the case of the Greek economy, a variety of factors have led to the creation of an economic chaos where the austerity measures and other similar policies are used to address the problem of economic recession.[2]

This essay attempts to examine and analyse this issue in order to answer the question of whether the austerity measures and the privatisation policies are ideal solutions for tackling the crisis. In the first part the term “economic crisis” shall be defined in order to clarify our terminological basis. Thereafter, the second part will present a brief historical background of past crises while it will also set this essay’s theoretical framework. In the third part there shall be examined, first, the new economic agenda that emerged from the outbreak of the economic crisis of 2008; subsequently there will be analysed the crisis in Greece and the implemented policies; and finally it will include a discussion about the possible future scenarios.

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Arab Revolts: A Firework or the Beginning of a New Era?

Andreas Themistocleous

With the beginning of the Arab revolts, several scholars spoke about a temporary and transient outburst without any serious prospects. Furthermore many said that these revolts were merely the expression of the popular anger and that they would not have any other impact. From that perspective the Arab popular anger consists of a combination of different factors (social, political and economic), which have their roots in the oppression of the authoritarian regimes as well as in the western imperialism of the past. This notion is also driven by other realties such as the cultural and social complexities of these people, which are at large a result of their colonial past, and the current global economic circumstances.

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