Elections in Northern Cyprus: The Akinci-Eroglu Showdown

Elections in Northern Cyprus: The Akinci-Eroglu Showdown

Source: financialmirror.com

By Yiannis Charalambous*

For those who follow developments in northern Cyprus, the results of the first round of the unrecognized ‘Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus’ elections confirmed what had more or less been predicted. Notably, that these elections are unpredictable and will definitely be decided in a two-round election.

19th of April saw incumbent Dervis Eroglu supported by the UBP and DP-UG coalition garnering 28.18%. He was followed by Mustafa Akinci, who was supported by the TDP and BKP and managed to receive 26.92%. CTP-BG candidate, Sibel Siber received 22.54% while former negotiator in the Cyprus peace process and independent candidate, Kudret Ozersay, garnered an astonishing 21.23%. Continue reading

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Can Syriza be a Beacon for Left Parties in Europe?

Can Syriza be a Beacon for Left Parties in Europe?

By Jason Iliou

Greece turned a major page in its political history electing the first radical left party in parliament after years of center and right-wing governments. Continue reading

Grassroots Level Democracy in Kashmir

Grassroots Level Democracy in Kashmir

By Haifa Peerzada

As the elections are underway for a much awaited change of political leadership in the State of Jammu and Kashmir, some of the basic essentials of good governance have not been given much attention or they have been ignored. With the killing of a Sarpanch associated with PDP, the issue of fragile self-governance at local levels in Jammu and Kashmir has again come to fore. This issue cuts right at the core of a larger issue which seeks to devolve more powers to the local authorities which may in turn lead to better development and good governance, free of corruption. But even this seems to be co-opted by the power politics in which various political parties religiously indulge.

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Obituary: Italian Parliamentary Democracy

Obituary: Italian Parliamentary Democracy

By Sebastiano Sali*

Almost 60 days after the national elections, Italy still does not have a government. Certainly, very far from Belgium’s 543 days world record, but nonetheless not reassuring at all. Italian politics and Italian politicians (statesmen in Italy do not appear in sight) have been so much confused about forming a new government after February 24/25th polls that have decided not to decide, setting forth the end of the Italian parliamentary democracy.

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